Fiction with Elizabeth McKenzie

Spend each morning workshop (9:30 a.m. - 12:30p.m.) with Elizabeth McKenzie and a group of between seven and twelve other writers. Each participant will submit up to twenty pages of fiction for review by the workshop group. The writing should be literary fiction and may be part of a larger work or a stand alone story. The workshop meets four mornings (Mon.-Thurs.) and each participant will receive focused feedback from the instructor and group on their craft. Workshop packets with all submissions will be available for online download after July 15th. Optional participant readings will be held.


Photo Credit: Gene Higa

Photo Credit: Gene Higa

 

Elizabeth McKenzie's latest novel The Portable Veblen appeared in 2016 to critical acclaim. It was named a Best Book of 2016 by NPR, the San Francisco Chronicle, The Guardian, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Kirkus, Elle, BookPage, and Largehearted Boy and was longlisted for the National Book Award and the Bailey's Prize for Women's Fiction. It has been translated into Dutch and released in the UK. McKenzie is also the author of the novel MacGregor Tells The World, a San Francisco Chronicle and Chicago Tribune Best Book of the Year, and Stop That Girl, which was short-listed for The Story Prize. Her fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The AtlanticBest American Nonrequired Reading, and has been recorded for NPR’s Selected Shorts. McKenzie is a senior editor at Chicago Quarterly Review, as well as the managing and fiction editor of Catamaran Literary Reader. She also teaches creative writing at Stanford Continuing Studies. To learn more about Elizabeth McKenzie, visit her website Stop That Girl.


About Elizabeth McKenzie The New York Times writes, "she hears the musical potential in language that others do not — in the manufactured jargon of economics, in the Latin taxonomy of the animal kingdom, even in the names of our own humble body parts. Her dialogue... leaves a bubbled contrail." The New York Times Book Review adds, “McKenzie is an accomplished humorist and a developed stylist, and she wastes no time dazzling the reader with her clean direct language, her simple but searing use of metaphor and her unflinching eye.” About Stop That Girl, Elizabeth Strout writes, “Vibrant and clear, these connected stories present a portrait of a family whose members are funny and hurtful and real, and watching them touched by time and change is very affecting. There is a lovely expansiveness here; surrounding the humor is the recognition that life is a serious deal.”