Evening in Conversation With Dorianne Laux

 

                                          Photo by John Campbell

                                          Photo by John Campbell

Biography

Dorianne Laux’s fifth collection, The Book of Men, winner of The Paterson Prize, is available from W.W. Norton. Her fourth book of poems, Facts about the Moon won The Oregon Book Award and was short-listed for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize. Laux is also author of Awake (Carnegie Mellon Classic Contemporary) What We Carry (finalist for the National Book Critic’s Circle Award) and Smoke, as well as two fine small press editions, The Book of Women, and Dark Charms, both from Red Dragonfly Press. Co-author of The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry, she’s the recipient of three Best American Poetry Prizes, a Pushcart Prize, two fellowships from The National Endowment for the Arts and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Widely anthologized, her work has appeared in the Best of APR, The Norton Anthology of Contemporary Poetry and The Best of the Net. In 2001, she was invited by late Poet Laureate Stanley Kunitz to read at the Library of Congress. Her poems have been translated into French, Spanish, Italian, Korean, Romanian, Dutch, Afrikaans and Brazilian Portuguese, and her selected works, In a Room with a Rag in my Hand, have been translated into Arabic by Camel/Kalima Press. In 2014 singer/songwriter Joan Osborne adapted her poem, “The Shipfitter’s Wife” and set it to music on her newest release, “Love and Hate”. Ce que nous portons (What We Carry,) translated by Helene Cardona, has just been published by Editions du Cygne Press, Paris. She directs the Program in Creative Writing at North Carolina State University and is founding faculty of Pacific University's Low Residency MFA Program.

You can find out more about Dorianne Laux and her work here

 

"Laux's fifth collection continues in her descriptive, storytelling vein: the at-hand, the matter-of-fact, the day-to-day are rendered in an earnest tone both sensuous and nostalgic. Something of a baby boomer's field guide, this book portrays the legacy of the 1960s from the perspective of one who has survived and must look back on what that decade did and didn't change." —Publisher's Weekly

"Each poem in The Book of Men is a world we pulse in & out of, each makes us aware of a distant music we never paid attention to before, each makes us aware of own bodies, as we hold the book, as we absorb her music, holding the stuff of the world in our hands. The poetry of Dorianne Laux is essential." —Nick Flynn